Mary Devine Award Winner


In celebration of its second decade of continuous publication, the Department of History and Clio's Eye is pleased to announce the 2015 articles for excellence. These annual awards honor our Writing Editor, Mary Rose Devine. Mrs. Devine has served as an advisor to Clio's Eye since 1999. After retiring from the English Department at Stephen F. Austin State University, where she taught for eighteen years, Mrs. Devine joined the Clio's Eye staff as an Editorial Co-ordinator, a position she still holds.

2016 Mary Devine Award Winner

Woman In Gold

Woman in Gold

By Kailee Densman Smith

2015 Mary Devine Award Winners

2014 Mary Devine Award Winner

Richard III:

Movie Jacket for Richard III

The Villain or Tudor Propaganda?

By Tyrrell Davidson

2013 Mary Devine Award Winners

Grand Duchess Anastasia

Anastasia

by Emma Richburg

The mystery of Anastasia is one of the most popular and enduring mysteries of the twentieth century. Anastasia was the youngest daughter of the last imperial family of Russia, the Romanovs. In February of 1917 the Bolshevik Revolution began in Russia and her father, Tsar Nicholas III was not popular among his people and many were dissatisfied with the government.

 

King Henry V of England

Henry V: Battle of Agincourt

By Joseph Bauer

Kenneth Branagh's screen play adaptation of William Shakespeare's Henry V was released in November, 1989. Branagh directed the film and played the starring role as King Henry V. This film focuses on the conflict between 15th century England's King Henry V and France's King Charles VI over the right to the French throne, and the bloody war which was fought to settle the dispute.


The Trojan Women

The Trojan Women

by Marina DonLevy

Once in a great while, a piece of art is able to stand the test of time. Sometimes these rare finds are due to fluke or fate, such as in the cases of treasures forgotten in natural disasters or stories left barely intact under layers of monks' ink. Some, however, are passed down, purposefully preserved for future generations because of the wonder they bring or the message they carry. For example, although many ancient Greek tragedies have been lost to us, the surviving works have helped to shape western dramatic techniques and some are even still being performed today. Euripides' The Trojan Women is one such play.


Telemachus & Odysseus

Odysseus: Man or Myth

by Gretchen Patterson

In 1997 the television broadcast of the Odyssey was ambitious, reaching for the elusive gold ring of ratings popularity, and therefore, advertising dollars to fatten the bank accounts of network executives. The sizable and talented cast includes Armand Assante as Odysseus, Greta Scacchi as Penelope, Isabella Rossellini as Athena, with Bernadette Peters and Vanessa Williams as the witches, Circe and Calypso, respectively. Alan Stenson plays the mature Telemachos, and Nicholas Clay is the handsome King Menelaus.

 

Pyramid of the Sun

Teotihuacan: City of Gods

by Gus Perea

In Search of The Great Mexican Pyramids is a film realized in 1997 by the History Channel. The 50 minute film was an installment in a series called In Search of History. The film depicts the mystery that the Teotihuacan temple represents and its importance. The great Teotihuacan society built the largest and first known metropolis in Mesoamerica. It has become one of the wonders of the world, and its air of mystery still intrigues archeologists today.

Mary Devine Awards: 2009 - 2012

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